Posted by: myautisticmuslimchild | November 3, 2012

Advice for new Doctors and Nurses Day 3 NHBPM

I have a lot of respect for all medical professionals, as I was one of them before my son  was diagnosed with ASD.

One major lesson I learned during my work in a medical field is to be patient and always listen to the family/caretaker.

We have a busy life, busy offices, hospital wings and sometimes it is hard to make time for our patient , therefore we miss out on a whole different picture. We are always quick to jump into conclusions, and thinking we know it all, or at least most things. In reality, that is not the case.

I wish the new doctors and nurses take some time to get to know their patients. I am not saying they have to sit around and listen to ones life story, but to hear them out would make a big difference in a patient doctor relationship.

When I started working I was told  “don’t waste your time listening, and pretending to listen, there is no time for that.” So I had an inner struggle, I wanted to impress the people I worked with, yet I wanted to do a better job with my patients.

My advice to any new medical professionals, please develop your own routine your own charisma,  and do not try to please your colleagues in an account of your own soul. It is hard to start your life as a doctor, nurse or any other medical professional, but it will get much more difficult when you have to deal with your conscience . Everything you learned in school and during internship/residency is in your mind and heart, use those experiences along with positive advice  from your co-workers.

Also, sometimes the answer to many medical questions lays in those stories that you hear from the patient. Pay attention, and respect the patients and their caretaker’s feelings.

Moreover, there will be times when you feel helpless, and whatever you try will not work. Please know, that those occasions are not your failures, this is just life, and it is ok to feel bad about it, but it is not ok to blame yourself and lose your confidence in your ability to help.

No one knows everything, and no one can be at the same place where they need to be always, life has its twists and turns and we just need to follow the path we think is best.

Sometimes people will get to you, they will be arrogant and  mean, returning their misbehavior will result in escalating the conflict. When you stay calm , you will represent that you are more superior to those who lose control, and that may be resulting of calming the situation. This task is not easy in the busy life of medicine, but it is much more beneficial than getting down to their level you never wanted to be.


Responses

  1. Great post and spot on information. Thank you.

    • thanks, if you can think of something else feel free to add i will share it with the readers.🙂

  2. Thanks for sharing that. I want to be a nurse oneday, Inshallah. When working with humans, compassion and sincerity needs to be there. No one has all the answers. My daughter was misdiagnosed many times. I went through this process for several years. Also, as a mother of a patient and advocate, I was in denial. Having forgiveness for the providers of health who are well-intentioned many times, but ill-informed or ignorant is essential for my own healing as well. Emotionally, to hear the words “autism” from a medical professional was hard. I got her tested for autism, in my mind, “to prove them wrong and really get down to the real problem to get the help she needed.” My denial and me being temporarily satisfied with Drs’ or psychologist’s misdiagoses lost years of potential therapy that came with the correct diagnosis “on the ASD spectrum, with Autism.” Being grateful in all circumpstances and dreaming new realistic goals for my child knowing her true strengths and true weakness has stood the test of time is a much better place to be.🙂

    • I agree with you in every point yo made, and I think it is important to be flexible in life always and see the positive side.


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